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Set five years after the events of Corpse Party: Blood Drive, Corpse Party 2: Dead Patient (which was released as Corpse Party 2: Dead Patient NEUES; in Japan) represents the start of a brand new storyline within the overall Corpse Party mythos. Protagonist Ayame and whatever friendly faces she can find must explore a dark and mostly abandoned hospital that’s seemingly on lockdown, in search of both answers and – ultimately – a way out. All the while, she and her newfound companions will solve inventory-based puzzles, collect the medical charts of deceased patients, use a stamina-based run mechanic to evade zombie-like pursuers and enormous creatures, and gather whatever pertinent clues they can find from various environmental objects and scattered writings. Although tying in to the storyline from the previous four Corpse Party titles in significant ways, Corpse Party 2: Dead Patient tells a standalone tale of horror for series fans and newcomers alike.

Brand New Setting, Same Creepy Atmosphere
This time it’s not an otherworldly elementary school, but a quarantined hospital full of bloodthirsty zombies, supernatural monsters, and scornful shades of the departed upon which our story opens.

Unique Cast of Characters with Some Familiar Names
Featuring an all-new set of dramatis personae while still rewarding series fans by tying back into the Heavenly Host story arc with a few familiar names and perhaps even a cameo appearance or two.

More Interactive Environment Than Ever Before
Items can be equipped and used directly on the environment to solve puzzles, or even held and used in Ayame’s hand to perform various functions. Ayame can also run in short spurts and hide in cabinets to evade foes.

Original Indie Team’s Return to PC
The same team responsible for the 2008 Windows PC edition of Corpse Party is back to deliver the most polished Corpse Party experience yet, with top-down 3D graphics featuring dynamic lighting, 360° control, emotional Japanese voice-acting, and one of series composer Mao Hamamoto’s moodiest soundtracks to date.