Why others publishers can & XSEED can't?

Discussion in 'Mostly Harmless (Serious Discussion)' started by rpg-maniac, Sep 12, 2016.

  1. rpg-maniac

    rpg-maniac New Member

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    I remember back in 2011 when Xenoblade released I was so hyped because it was a game made by one of my all time favorite JRPG creator, Tetsuya Takahashi, the genius behind Xenogears, so few days before we get the game in EU the first thing I did was buying a Wii, a new console although I wasn't interested to play any other game, I got it because I wanted to play that one single game, the second thing I did was to pre-order the CE of Xenoblade as it had something that I needed in order to play the game, a classic controller, so it was worth the extra money I pay, at this point I must say that I would never do all that if the game didn't include the original Japanese audio, there is 2 things for me that I can't tolerate when I purchase a new game, lack of the original dub & censoring, when a game either miss the original VO or come in our region butchered by the publisher full of censoring left & right I can't bring myself to pay as I find it not worth my money, I pay only for the original/unedited/uncensored product with only a translation on it & nothing else.

    So when 6 months later XSEED publish The Last Story without include the Japanese dub although it was a game that I was interested to play at that time, I skip it & never got it, unfortunately XSEED continue to this day to disappoint again & again by releasing games that I would like to play but I can't as I consider them incomplete, like the 2 Trails of Cold Steel games for example, & I can't help but wonder why in our age at 2016 there is still publishers who release games without a dual audio option? we are talking for PS3 games so excuses that there is not enough space can't be used anymore.

    Why so many other game publishers always include on their games the Japanese dub no matter what & XSEED can't? how NIS always include the Japanese dub in every Atelier & Disgaea series game? even Nintendo did it with Xenoblade & FE: Awakening & that one was a 3DS game btw.. also even SE start include the Japanese audio they did it with Star Ocean 4 & 5 and as I read FFXV will also include dual audio, NAMCO BANDAI who never did it till now start recognizing finally how important this is for some fans & they did the start with the remaster of Tales of Symphonia & continue the trend with Tales of Zestiria, it seems that they plan to always include it from now on & that's how it should be from the start but as they say "better late than never".

    So yeah that's my question in the end why all those publishers do it/can do it & XSEED can't?
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2016
  2. Chaosblade77

    Chaosblade77 Well-Known Member

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    Sometimes they have been able to include Japanese audio. Some games like Corpse Party only have Japanese, no English.

    It's a matter of licensing, and a lot of your examples are localized by western branches of the Japanese company. That's probably pretty beneficial and makes the licensing work easier, especially if they plan ahead.

    That said, you would think they would be able to work something out for nearly every Marvelous release (since they are XSEED's parent company), and probably most Falcom releases at this point, but that doesn't seem to be the case as far as I know.
     
  3. Wyrdwad

    Wyrdwad Administrator Staff Member

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    Falcom is pretty much a no across the board -- licensing-wise, we're never able to include Japanese voices in Falcom games. We've tried, every time, but we always hit a wall.

    The same was true of The Last Story and Pandora's Tower -- we wanted to be able to offer Japanese voices, but that wasn't an option. All we could do was release the games with English voices only, or not release them at all.

    It's never our choice not to include as many options as possible. It always comes down to licensing in the end.

    We do release games with dual voice, though (Akiba's Trip, Return to PopoloCrois, Killer Is Dead, etc.), as well as games with the original Japanese voices only (every Senran Kagura game, every Corpse Party game, Way of the Samurai 4, Touhou: Scarlet Curiosity, etc.). So again -- it all comes down to what the original developers allow.

    -Tom
     
  4. Captain Falcon

    Captain Falcon Well-Known Member

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    By "a lot" I think you mean "almost all of them". The only one I can see isn't the case is NIS and Atelier, and that isn't even right anymore; they still distribute, but the actual publisher is Koei Tecmo.
     
  5. dunno001

    dunno001 Member

    To add in, the Japanese voice market has quite a bit of intricacies. I'm not privvy to any contract information, but I would guess if XSeed can't get any on Falcom's titles, that Falcom's standard contract includes paying the VAs a fee (either flat, or with royalties), but does not retain ownership of said recording, and thus can not include it themselves. At this point, to include the Japanese voices would require negotiating with each VA's manager seperately, and that gets very expensive. (In the anime world, FUNimation stated they couldn't use opening 1 for Kodocha due to Johnny's, the managing group controlling the first opening song, wanted an unjustifiable amount of money for rights to use the song. Media Blasters also had to change the name of Weiss Kreutz due to the dub not using the voices of Weiss.)

    For games that do come out in America with Japanese voices, I'd guess the studio did have an ownership retention clause. Usually there would be an extra fee to use these, most of which is a sublicensing royalty going back to the VA's managing company. There is, of course, the possibility that the work was done sheerly on a "for hire" basis (more common for newer VAs trying to break in), and that it's seen as a charge for additional materials held by the property licensor. To get the voices themselves, though, is almost never free.

    Details will vary from title to title, and certain patterns by company may emerge, but voice acquisition is its own complex web with a myriad of rules. I'd prefer them to be present, but can understand why sometimes they're not. Some localization companies (hello, NoA) do have habits of not trying for Japanese voices unless they feel a title will be lower performing, and it would just be cheaper to license voices then record new English ones. Dubbing is quite expensive, which in part explains why it's never a simple call. I know in anime licensing, dubbing is the second largest expense (when done) after the license itself. I would guess that to be similar for games; how much it adds on to a license cost, well... I can only speculate there...
     
  6. Ghaleon

    Ghaleon Active Member

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    I realize this thread is old and done with, but I clicked it because the subject title and I didn't realize its age at the time. I mean it's near the top of page 1 ffs.

    Anyway, I'm not responding to the TC here, but just the forum members in general. I see people state things like the TC all the freakin' time, and it drives me nuts because you think these people who are so 'passionate' about this that they would know better by now. Seriously. you have to be living in a cave to not know the reasons for dual voice missing is due to legal contracts and whatever in Japan. And why do these people ALWAYS ALWAYS ALWAYS 100% of the time say 'butchered'.. like seriously. It's like they copy paste their rants from a textbook or something
     
  7. Captain Falcon

    Captain Falcon Well-Known Member

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    Especially when they can't actually understand the language to begin with.

    Now, I'm not one to blast anybody for playing games with Japanese audio and subtitles; I play such games and watch such anime all the time. But it's the vehement zealots that get me when, again, they then need subtitles to actually understand what is being said (and that's assuming the subtitles actually match what's being said, which is certainly not always the case).
     

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