Ask Us About Kiseki

Discussion in 'The Legend of Heroes Series' started by omgfloofy, Jan 29, 2014.

  1. garion333

    garion333 New Member

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    I was under the impression the NISA forums were a barren wasteland. Has that changed?
     
  2. Yotaka

    Yotaka Well-Known Member

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    That... may not be as crack as you'd think.
    It's been mentioned several times that the septium veins in the east are depleting for unknown reasons. We know there's something driving a huge wave of emmigration from there to the central and western parts of the continent and they may be related. Whether the Sept-Terrion are somehow responsible, whether it's something related to the Outside or who knows what, there's definitely an environmental angle that's being hinted at.

    Eh, it's probably safe but you never know, people do pick up the series from the start after all. There's someone who I just saw streaming the end of FC for the first time (who had already played Cold Steel) and they were caught completely flat-footed by the twists at the end, getting a glorious double reaction to the big reveal. So yeah, we should keep tagging them just in case.

    On Weissmann
    True, knowing more of the big picture it's easier to see Weissmann as not being completely a 'I'm evil and I do evil things!' antagonist (especially when you can compare him to someone who was definitely worse) but even in the context of a blind run of SC you can tell that there's more than just sadism at work. He's completely off his rocker on the best way to solve the problems humanity's facing but he does genuinely believe Aureole is the solution.

    On the others, Erpy covered it pretty well.
    I'm certainly not planning on going anywhere. It's nice and chill here and it's been a hub for discussing the series for the better part of a decade now so I'm not inclined to move.
     
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  3. zwabbit

    zwabbit Active Member

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    Oh, oh, I thought of another question! Do we get an explanation of what Ouroboros' objective in Crossbell was?
     
  4. Yotaka

    Yotaka Well-Known Member

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    It's pretty much what Vita said in CS2, just with a bit more context added.
    They needed Demiourgos to awaken in order to set the stage for the appearance of the Infernal Castle and Vita's attempt to set up an artificial Rivalry. Demiourgos awakening caused the septium veins to start going nuts and that made it possible for things like the Magic Knights to activate, ultimately setting things up for the Castle to be summoned.
     
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  5. nivora

    nivora Active Member

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    not just environmental, well in case of Calvard yes but i think if we look at the bigger picture of the sept-terrion right now they all have resulted in disaster in same way. The Aureole became so omnipotent in helping it's tribe that they started losing what made them human. Demiourgos on the opposite side was too humane itself getting a consciousness about it's place in society. Lost Zem and Arc Rouge where such strong opposites in close area they had been drawn in endless conflict giving birth to a cataclysmic power that probably would have enveloped all of Zemuria over time. They all have shown t be stronger for their own good but especially Steel goes a step further because it's influence through the Curse/Twilight severing the ties between dimensions which clearly is a dangerous thing.

    Though more in general i think it is very obvious that we have a scenario where the septian revolution resulted in everything happening right now, McBurn arrived way too close around the start of said revolution for it to be coincidence, Kafai has explicitly said ley lines are drying out
     
  6. LrdDimwit

    LrdDimwit New Member

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    He's a very interesting one.

    Bleublanc talks the talk alright, but every time we see him have an opportunity to actually walk the walk (and be the villain he likes to play), he doesn't. Take the end of Chapter 1. Dorothy? Sneaking up on him? Highly dubious. Especially considering the little scene of Kevin spying on him and Loewe. Then there's the end of Chapter 8. First, when the Queen says 'you don't really need BOTH of us, taking just me ought to be enough', he is about to accept (when the cavalry show up). One of the other Enforcers even says 'Wait, weren't you interested in the princess? You really want to let her go?'. He has a very fine speech in response... But yes, he wants to let her go. And all throughout the raid on Grancel, the other Enforcers - including him - work to keep Renne reined in. After the cavalry arrives, Renne says 'screw it, enough is enough, I AM calling Pater Mater!' - and Bleublanc expertly handles her into letting things drop and retreating.

    In CS2, he delivers another fine speech to Gaius, threatening to burn down the plains (I forget the name). Sounds really threatening - Gaius sure takes it that way - but I notice that Bleublanc had ample time to set up anything he wanted, and yet when your party arrives, there is a distinct lack of anything actually being on fire.

    So I would argue he's actually been fairly consistent.

    You can't really *ignore* the things he says - the implication is he's perfectly willing to let the nasty things he talks about happen, if you screw up his tests. And we know his off-camera thefts (il.e. ones NOT involving player characters) are well-known, and many of the things he stole were never recovered - implying a lot of folks fail his tests.

    But at least in the 5 games we have in English, he isn't known for leaving a trail of *bodies* in his wake. (And indeed, the times in SC where solving his puzzles leads to a fight, they're scaled down to be level-appropriate ... even though he clearly has access to way more powerful things.) His actions speak louder than his words. Leaving taunting messages in the Capel? Without harming the Capel in the process (a not insignificant feat, given how few people know how it works)? Sneaking into General Morgan's house (to leave a note on the clock)? Waltzing into the Bracer Guildhall to leave taunting messages? Stealing their sign, in broad daylight, in the middle of the marketplace, without anybody seeing anything? The skills it takes to pull these things off mean that he ought to be capable of anything. The only reason those diabolical things he likes to talk about haven't actually happened yet is that he doesn't really seem to want them to.
     
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  7. zwabbit

    zwabbit Active Member

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    So in regards to the rivalry and the overall master plan.
    1) What exactly is it that Osborne/Franz did that managed to get the rivalry "going" whereas Vita's attempt failed?
    2) What was the necessity of "killing" the earth guardian? My understanding is that it held a great deal of the corruption that could push people to take violent action ad the like, but was this corruption also intrinsically part of Ishmelga so it needed to be released for it to be whole, or was there another reason for taking it down?
    3) What was the actual mechanism by which Ishmelga was killed in the non-"true" ending? In the "original" ending it looks as if Rean basically suicides, destroying Valimar and himself along with it, and that somehow was sufficient to kill it as well?
     
  8. Yotaka

    Yotaka Well-Known Member

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    1 and 2 are linked. The circumstances needed to get the Rivalry going were not just conflict but a massive conflict. The Erebonian civil war wasn't big enough but a war that literally involved everyone in western Zemuria plus Arteria was the kind of huge conflict that the Rivalry needed, with Ishmelga's influence amplifying hatred and the like. The Earth Beast was actively containing most of Ishmelga's corrupting influence so he had to be killed (and Ishmelga free to affect more and more people) in order for the war-fever to reach the kind of manic pitch that the Rivalry needed.

    For the other question, With all the power of Steel gathered in one place and fully materialized, it was possible for Rean to destroy Ishmelga by having Valimar blow up before it could be completely corrupted. In other words, Rean pretty much did commit suicide, using Valimar's power to climb as high as he could before setting off the explosion. it's not made clear whether this truly killed Ishmelga or just disrupted it severely. At the very least, he denied Ishmelga a new physical vessel and scattered its power all across the upper atmosphere, so the worst case scenario is probably similar to what happened with Sauron at the end of Lord of the Rings; not dead but rendered so powerless that it couldn't threaten Zemuria again. But that's just me speculating, the game doesn't provide much detail.

    Rean says he'll definitely return and the new Class VII tells everyone they believe he'll do it (with Crow and Millium) but there's no indication of how he'd get better from vaporizing himself so that sounds more like an 'I'd like to believe this' statement rather than anything realistic.
     
  9. Ghaleon

    Ghaleon Active Member

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    I don't think this spoils anything since it's vague but oh well.
    Yeah, he is definitely is greater than he shows, I've said this multiple times why I think so. I wonder if this is as obvious to the other Oroborus members canonically in game or not.

    Unrelated to the above. Question for CS3 vets. Is there any kind of save carry-over from CS2 to 3?
     
  10. Yotaka

    Yotaka Well-Known Member

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    It is, you'll see in due time. xD
    Nope, none whatsoever.
     
  11. Erpy

    Erpy Active Member

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    He's kind of wishy-washy/maybe, maybe not about it, but when you read about his (probable) backstory in Sky the 3rd, it would actually partially explain this (possiblemaybe) change of heart.

    B's Star Door mentions that he fancies himself a "liberator of beauty". His favorite targets involves things/people he considers to possess beauty that are denied a chance to shine in front of the rest of the world. Gems/art that's locked up in a warehouse somewhere. A revolutionairy tank prototype that was never put in production and is wasting away in a lab. A nobleman's wife who's being neglected. If you look at the life Kloe's been living most of her life, you'll notice some similarities. Despite being in line for the throne, Kloe's essentially hiding away in an academy's dormitory, shunning the spotlight and nobody at Jenis, aside from Jill, Hans and Dean Collins, even know who she is. Duke Dunan even calls her on it, in his own tactless fashion, bringing up her habit of trying to avoid attention as an argument for being unsuited to the throne. Kloe being a "hidden gem" in her own right at least partially explains the Phantom Thief's obsession with her.

    Likewise, at the time the enforcers storm the castle, Kloe's just accepted the succession for the throne, meaning she'll cast aside her double life and commit to a place on the national political stage. Given what we know of him, it's not unlikely this caused B's interest in her to drop significantly.
     
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  12. zwabbit

    zwabbit Active Member

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    So a question about a certain father. Or fathers even.
    What is Franz's situation exactly? Is he himself a gnome? And more generally, what is the nature of this "possession" that he and Osborne are ostensibly under?
    Also, while I can come up with plenty of rationales on my own, but regarding the endgame.
    Are we given an in-game reason for why Ishmelga needs to be made whole again before it can be killed? Put it another way, is it explained why destroying the divine knights (on the premise that they can be destroyed of course) individually isn't sufficient?
     
  13. Yotaka

    Yotaka Well-Known Member

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    1. Franz Reinford was a descendant of the Gnomes and thus open to possession but he wasn't knowingly a part of them before Alberich possessed him. Alberich is a sort of spirit-image of the leader of the Gnomes from ages past which Ishmelga uses to possess people. It's a bit unclear how it works and Kondo has made some comments that we need to get more information on regarding this. Despite the weirdness, Franz counted as being the rightful heir to the Kin of the Earth for purposes of accessing the Sacrament Program of the Sept-Terrion of Earth at the very end of the game.

    With Osborne, he's piloting a Divine Knight that's pretty much possessed by Ishmelga and he was forcibly made its Awakener as the condition of Ishmelga using its power to save Rean's life. Incidentally, this is a nice early hint of the powers the Sept-Terrion of Earth and Fire possess (dominion over 'physical bodies' and 'souls' respectively) since it was able to remove Rean's damaged heart and replace it with Osborne's. Anyhow, Osborne has Ishmelga's voice constantly whispering in his head and demanding that he 'Return it to me... all that I am'. Osborne's mental resilience was such that he never broke under the constant pressure. Plus, most of what Osborne did was what Ishmelga wanted to happen anyways (their plans basically were in lockstep until the moment Osborne triggered the final Rivalry) so it didn't pay as much attention to him as it really should have considering their past history.

    2. The Divine Knights literally can't be destroyed outside of the Rivalry. Remember how Valimar self-repairs at the start of CS2? Well, they can all do that since they're each holding a seventh the power of two Sept-Terrion. It's revealed in 4 that even if they're completely annihilated, they'll reform in time. One thing the game also reveals is that when a Knight is destroyed, its Awakener almost always becomes a Nosferatu. That weird battlefield where Loa Erebonius is fought in the end of CS1 is a representation of the ruined weapons previously possessed by Knights defeated in this manner. I don't think anyone told the Awakeners about that part of the deal...

    Anyhow, since the Knights can only be truly destroyed during the Rivalry by having their power absorbed, the only way to destroy Ishmelga is to gather all that power in one vessel, at which point it became vulnerable.
     
  14. zwabbit

    zwabbit Active Member

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    Edited slightly for clarity.
    Was it explained what the mechanism that allows for this reformation is? Or is it something that's chalked up to the Sept-Terrions' powers? Similarly, was an explanation given for why the power is somehow more vulnerable when fully united? What stops the "completed" form of the divine knights combined from reforming after being "destroyed?"
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2019
  15. Yotaka

    Yotaka Well-Known Member

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    I'm not sure they explained it specifically.
    Given that the one Sept-Terrion can control 'bodies' and the associated Sacred Beast is the one who helped create the Divine Knights, it's probably just 'Sept-Terrion hax' at work. When fully united and Ishmelga is completely focused on one physical vessel, it becomes vulnerable because it doesn't have anywhere to escape to. My guess for the 'why can't Great One!Valimar reform?' question is that choosing to destroy itself is within its power and overrides whatever caused the individual Divine Knights to repair themselves. We know this is something a Sept-Terrion can do because it's how Demiourgos was lost 1200 years ago. With Ishmelga not fully in control of Valimar and Rean, there was time for Rean to give that a try.
     
  16. zwabbit

    zwabbit Active Member

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    It does raise an interesting possibility though.
    Going along with the previous line of thought about how the Sept-Terrions actually need to draw in energy to perform their miracles, there is also the possibility that conduits to perform this energy gathering also have to exist. In the case of the combined Steel, these conduits would be the divine knights themselves, which we already know from the games draw energy from their surroundings. This being the case, it is possible that a destroyed divine knight can be restored because other knights remain to draw in the necessary energy to power its restoration. I also suspect that the amount of energy being drawn in is, substantial. As in enough to seriously accelerate the depletion of the septium/dragon veins. That would provide an explanation for why an attempt was not made to just outright destroy all of the knights individually, because the amount of power required seems to only be possessed by another divine knight, and the time it would take to get to all of them might be so long, depending on whether any of the other awakeners feel like cooperating, that you could end up accidentally destroying the world before you can finish the task.

    Conversely with the rivalry, the divine knights are not destroyed in the sense of requiring regeneration, so there is not this increased drain when they are defeated. And inflicting a self-kill after all of the knights have been unified would also destroy the only remaining conduit from which the necessary energy from regeneration could be drawn, hence why Ishmelga is "vulnerable" in that state.
     
  17. galendo

    galendo New Member

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    Hi everyone! I've a (hopefully) quick question. I played through Moonlight Witch and Tears of Vermillion what seems like ages ago (PSP versions). I found the games fine but not exceptional, and after playing through two similar games in more-or-less a row, I wasn't feeling up to playing the third one. But now, perhaps a decade or so later, I've been thinking about playing Song of the Ocean. The only issue is, I've heard that its plot connects to the other two, and I forget most of what happened.

    The question is: what do I need to know/remember to appreciate the third game?

    I still remember the basic plot outlines, but the names and details rather elude me. For instance, here's what I remember about Moonlight Witch:

    So this boy and this girl (who has kind of a boy's name if I remember correctly) go on a pilgrimage with a magic dagger to visit the four elemental shrines 'cause it's their village tradition. The dagger is somehow magical because it grants the boy visions and the power to use elemental magic as they reach the shrines. At the first shrine the boy had some kind of vision and then at the second shrine there's another vision of a leviathan attacking somewhere, so they go stop the leviathan from attacking. It's actually a pretty wimpy leviathan, getting its ass kicked by the boy and the girl and whoever else is in the party at that point -- I know at one point there was an older man in the party who had accompanied the eponymous White Witch on her previous pilgrimage, but I don't remember where or when he joined the party -- but it turns out the leviathan was being mind-controlled by someone, though I forget who or why. Probably the evil queen.

    Anyway, the boy and the girl continue their journey to the next two shrines -- if anything important happened in the meantime, I don't remember it, although at some point they visit a village with an old pirate and a ship captain named Thomas who were friends for some reason. I remember the captain/sailor Thomas was also a minor character in Vermillian Tears, though I don't remember him or the pirate playing much of a role in either game.

    After the last shrine, there's a touching scene of a snowy mountain where the previous White Witch got killed by the evil queen and the party gets a magic sword. (I know the old man who was her guardian knight is in the party at this point, and I'm sure there was a fourth character as well -- pretty certain it was a girl, but I don't remember any details. I don't remember why the old knight left the magic sword there, other than as a memento or something.)

    Anyway, it turns out there's been a war of sorts between two worlds -- the world of the witches and the world that the game takes place in. A long time ago some sort of dangerous magic made this Gargav trench between the two continents which is supposedly for some reason a big deal that no one can get past, and the dangerous magic threatened to destroy the world, so the ancient people shoved the dangerous magic into the witches' world. The evil queen now wants to bring it back to destroy the current world rather than the witches' world, but the party stops her and everyone goes home and lives happily ever after.

    And here's what I remember about Tears of Vermillion:
    Here there's a boy and his sister who lived in a church (probably they were orphans) but they're split up when the forces of the evil god attack. The boy goes and lives with an old man who dies early on, leaving him and his friend to go questing for the sister. They go to the nearby city and join forces with a tomboy princess (who doesn't really matter IIRC) and find some sort of evil book from an evil organization threatening to do something evil. The boy and his friend continue on and help some girl save her forest from the evils of industrialization and eventually find the sister who's been adopted by some people in a random town, but then of course she's kidnapped by pirates or something and the boy and his friend chase after her on a ship (this is where the Thomas character from the other game shows up, as he's a sailor on the ship).

    They get the sister back, and then they decide for some reason to make a pilgrimage to the holy city where the boy and girl lived when they were kids. Before they get there, though, for some reason the party is separated and the sister and the friend get supposedly killed in a carriage accident/ambush by an evil wizard, only of course they're still alive. It turns out the girl is necessary to resurrect the evil god for some reason, so the wizard captures her rather than killing her. I don't really remember what the main boy was doing at this point but at some point he goes back to his old hometown only to find that his friend is still alive but has been brainwashed. For some reason this kicks off a quest to visit the four elemental spirits and eventually get a magic sword that lets them break through a magic barrier erected by the evil wizard who kidnapped the sister. Or maybe he knew the sister was alive but kidnapped, and going to his hometown was part of the quest to talk to the four spirits.

    There was also some wizard named Lap or somesuch who showed up at some point. He had come from the other side of the Gargav trench and he was an old man who lived outside of the hometown in the first game, but he didn't really do much in either game that I recall.

    Anyway, the party eventually visits all the spirits and gets the magic sword, which is either the magic sword from the first game or maybe the magic dagger that collects the spirits' power, and they use it to kill the evil god. There's also some sort of good god who dies too, because that's the way things work. And then everyone goes and lives happily ever after again.

    I thought I could maybe read through a plot summary on Wikipedia or somewhere, but Wikipedia doesn't have one, so I thought maybe you guys would know where to find a good summary and/or know what I need to know/remember to appreciate the third game.
     
  18. Yotaka

    Yotaka Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to the forums!
    You actually remember most of what you need in terms of broad details, though there are a few inaccuracies in your memory. Timeline-wise, the games go A Tear of Vermillion, then Cagesong of the Ocean (about eight years later) and then White Witch (about fifty years later).

    The childrens' names are Julio and Chris(tina). The pilgrimmage isn't just a village tradition but is followed by other towns and also the 'Witches', though multiple characters note that fewer and fewer people are doing it nowadays. The silver dagger isn't presented as being magical, it's just a symbol of the pilgrimmage that lets people know the two are taking part in it. They actually have five places to visit (called Sharines) and the dagger does seem to react to the mirrors in each Sharine, which isn't normal. You'll want to remember that. Each Sharine vision is in some way disturbing, which is also not what normally happens when people do the pilgrimmage.

    The key plot thread that runs through the game is the titular White Witch, a girl who followed the same route that Julio and Chris are taking, twenty years earlier. Different towns have different opinions about her, some claiming she cursed the lands she walked through and others remembering good things she did for them. Her name is Geld and she's from a clan of witches who are believed to live on an island off the coast of Pholthia which nobody has ever been able to find. You will definitely wnt to remember her. The man who traveled with her in the past is Durzel, who led the army of Pholthia, the country where the game begins and ends. He winds up imprisoned in a tower by the queen and you have to break him out near the end.

    Thomas is a major background character in the series, a captain and adventurer. There are books (and NPCs) talking about him all over the game as he was basically a folk hero. Julio and Chris encounter him under an assumed identity and only realize who he is when the other guy using an alias (a former pirate named Ramon) reveals it. Remember both of them.

    The sword is named Esperanza and was given to Durzel by 'Ortega', a great magus who gets referenced a lot over the course of the game. He left the sword there because after failing to save Geld, he didn't think he was worthy of it so he left it to mark her grave. That scene you remember has another twist worth remembering, what makes the sword's power return is that Chirs places the staff that 'Grandpa Lap' gave her at the start of the game on the grave. It's actually Geld's own staff which he's been keeping for almost twenty years, the two having previously met.

    At the very end of the game, Durzel reveals that 'Ortega' is an alias for Michel De Lap Heaven, aka 'Grandpa Lap'. If you put all the evidence from the games together, this means that Michel set up about half the plot of the game, with Geld setting up the other half.

    The antagonists are Pholthia's queen Isabelle (who was found washed up on a beach around the same time Geld began her pilgrimmage and nursed back to health by the king, though for some reason the PSP version omitted this scene) and her assistant the astrologer Revas. When she's defeated, Isabelle says something very significant, that the world she's trying to destroy isn't at all innocent. Do remember this and remember that the caraclysm she was summoning was called the Wave of Raual. Geld and Isabelle (and Revas, incidentally) came from the same world and were trying to pursue different means of stopping the Wave, with the latter killing the former to prevent her from trying to carry out a plan she thought was too reckless. Said plan ultimately gets pulled off when Geld's soul sleeping within her staff fuses with the Wave to nullify its power. This too, you might want to remember.

    The Gagharv is a huge rift that separates Tirasweel from the lands to the west. As you recall, it was implied to be caused by the same magic as the Wave but it was not the result of a war. How that magic came to exist isn't revealed here. There's also a (non-magical) barrier preventing travel to the south, a mountain range called the Spine of the Serpent All three games in the Gagharv Trilogy take place on the same continent, separated by these two barriers.

    This game takes place in El Phildin, the land on the other side of the Gagharv from White Witch's Tirasweel. A major background point to remember is that there were three major gods in this game, Durga (the 'Spirit Goddess'), Bardus (God of Light) and Octum (God of Darkness). A thousand years ago or so, Bardus and Octum fought over the world, with the former wanting to maintain what they had created and the latter wanting to remake it anew. This resulted in Octum being imprisoned but not killed and Bardus dividing his power into six fragments known as the Divine Treasures.

    Avin and Eimelle are the brother and sister you remember and they were taken in by the Church of Bardus and lived at Cathedral, the headquarters of the Church. They were orphans but the Church had an ulterior motive for taking them in as well. Eimelle is 'Durga's Daughter', a human touched by the goddess who can hear her voice and whose blood has a special power. Durga's Daughter isn't a hereditary position and passes to a newborn child once the current one dies. Cathedral is attacked by Octum's Apostles, a group dedicated to that god who want to resurrect him and they need Eimelle to do it. Avin and Eimelle get separated in the attack, with Avin sent to live with one of the three Sages of the Church and Eimelle taken to an undisclosed location for her own protection.

    Seven years after that, the sage Avin was living with passes away and entrusts him with one of the Divine Treasures which he was keeping. In the intervening years, Avin has become friends with Mile, a boy his age from the town where he took refuge. The two set off for the capital city of Phildin to become adventurers in the hope that they'll be able to find evidence of Eimelle's whereabouts, or that they'll become famous and she'll learn about them.

    The first half of the game consists of a series of adventures as the duo make their way across the eastern half of El Phildin, frequently just missing Eimelle or having leads evaporate on them. During the course of this, they meet the second Sage and have multiple encounters with Octum's Apostles. In particular, they repeatedly clash with a girl named Rutice who joined the Apostles after her home was destroyed by monsters. Her brother Rouca works as an engineer in the city of Guia and is trying to find her while she's trying not to be found. They also have repeated run-ins with a redhaired man named Madram who seems to have a grudge against both the Apostles and the Church of Bardus. Eventually Avin and Mile find Eimelle (and the second Divine Treasure) in the port city of Balloa and are reunited. A certain Captain Thomas is instrumental in foiling an attempted kidnapping of Eimelle, back before he was internationally famous. The trio travel to Valkd, the new headquarters of the Church in the western half of El Phildin. On the way they're attacked by the leader of Octum's Apostles, a man named Belias. He kills one of the Apostles for screwing up and then turns on Rutice for being too soft, giving her a change of heart about the whole 'working for the God of Darkness' gig. Then he kills Mile, takes Eimelle and leaves.

    Having nowhere else to go, Rutice winds up traveling with Avin to atone for what she did as an Apostle. The major event that kickstarts the second half of the story is a visit to Truth Island, a place where there's a mirror that supposedly shows true visions of the future. Avin sees four locations and then a vision of a sword. In order to defeat Octum, it's necessary to gather all the Sacred Treasures and merge them with a sword made from a rare metal which will then contain all the power of Bardus. The four locations Avin sees are the shrines where the Great Spirits dwell and where the remaining Treasures will be found. Oh, something else about this sequence to remember: Michel is investigating the island when Avin arrives, recognizes that the architecture is similar to what he's seen in Tirasweel and he's able to make the mirror activate with a subtle bit of magic. This is what prompts the backtracking later on as two of the four shrine are in the eastern half of El Phildin.

    As you remember, Mile was resurrected (so yes, he actually died earlier) and is working for Octum's Apostles. The third act ends on the island of Kanaphia where the final shrine is hidden and it was the place where Dominique, the previous Durga's Daughter, was hiding from the Apostles. The Church failed to protect her when the Apostles found her, which is why Madram hates both groups. He sacrifices himself to kill one of the Apostles and Avin is able to obtain the final Treasure.

    With the help of Rouca in forging the rare metal into a sword and the Church's magic, the blade and Treasures are merged into Elysion, the Divine Sword. Avin takes it to Cathedral where the power of the sword dispels the barrier the Apostles erected around it. Inside he fights the possessed Mile and frees him from Belias' control. The group then travels deep into the earth beneath the church where Octum has been sealed away. When they reach Belias and fight him, Gawaine (the third and final Sage) asks why Belais turned away from Bardus and followed Octum. It's revealed that Belias visited Truth Island in the past and saw a vision of the world being utterly destroyed by something. Since Bardus believed in maintaining the world, the only way to save the world (he thought) would be to awaken Octum and have him remake the entire thing from the ground up, regardless of the cost in doing so. After he's defeated, Octum essentially eats Eimelle and the power in her blood revives him. Cue epic final boss battle.

    Once Octum is defeated, Bardus reveals that he must disappear from the world as well because he and Octum are linked and if he remains the latter will be able to return. Eimelle is restored but Mile begins to fade away, as his life was linked to Octum when he was resurrected. Bardus (with a bit of help from Durga) gives Avin the power to perform one last miracle, which he uses to essentially travel to the afterlife and bring Mile back.

    At the very end Avin, Mile and Eimelle return to Ourt and Avin gives Michel the now-depowered Elysion for safekeeping. The trio are eventually joined by Rutice (who left to sort out her feelings) and Shanon, Mile's maybe-love interest. The stinger at the end of the game is Michel traveling with Captain Thomas and discussing their next moves, with Michel thinking that Elysion's name no longer fits it. Thomas suggests giving it a new one fitting an age where humanity no longer needs to rely on the power of gods and this gives Michel an idea. He renames the sword Esperanza.

    Minor side-notes and corrections: Archem (the girl from the forest) isn't worried about industrialization but a monster that's spreading deadly poison. Eimelle wasn't adopted but was staying with that couple while waiting for Avin and Mile to find her. One fun example of how this series contains tons of connecting threads, one of the adventurers Avin and Mile meet along the way is Lucias, known as the Sapphire-Eyed. She's the subject of the collectable 'Swordswoman Sapphie' books that Julio and Chris can obtain in White Witch. And in another fun connection, Michel learns about a magical stone called Crimsonfire while traveling in Avin's company. He eventually brought this to Tirasweel where they were used in the plan to stop the sea monster Galga and in the end to break Revas' globe. Yeah, the series has a lot of moments like that. You don't need to remember them all to appreciate the main plot but it's fun when you spot them

    Hopefully that's helpful to you. If you've got any questions feel free to ask. I adore the Gagharv Trilogy and am always happy to talk about them at length. xD

    Oh, and if you're ever interested in seeing what the original PC versions of the game looked like, omgfloofy played the entire trilogy last year. They're in Japanese but she (and the chat) provide a running commentary so you can follow along. White Witch, AToV, Cagesong.
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2019
  19. galendo

    galendo New Member

    Messages:
    2
    Wow, thanks so much Yotaka! That's a great summary! I'm surprised and impressed that you responded so fast. I think it's given me the impetus to tackle Song of the Ocean. (Is it Song of the Ocean or Cagesong? I'm guessing it's a translation thing, but those seem like pretty different translations....)
     
  20. Ghaleon

    Ghaleon Active Member

    Messages:
    726
    Japan seems to get more outfits than we did. Are theirs payed dlc? I dont know if its for 3 or 4 but I recall a set of fantasy outfits like princess knight, magical idol, whatever. Was that layed dlc? Kinda wondering if NISA will include these or not.
     

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