Anyone going to college? What's your major?

Discussion in 'Mostly Harmless (Serious Discussion)' started by MrDetective, Aug 9, 2016.

  1. MrDetective

    MrDetective Member

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    Location:
    Lawndale, United States
    Hey guys, :D

    I am studying at CSULB, and my current major is Japanese. It was my backup plan because I couldn't get into Computer Science. I thought I could become a translator for a video game company or some sort. Now I am thinking of double majoring in Finance or Marketing. I heard Accounting has a lot of math, and I did horribly in Calculus, so I don't think I can get into that. I was good at math in high school, though, but I haven't been taking math in 3 years, so I am not very good at it anymore. I wonder what I will learn in Finance, and how hard it's going to be. :O

    I have an appointment on Friday to ask my counselor for advice. I'm just asking in advance if Japanese + Finance is a good combination. Would that get me a job in a game company? I don't actually know what I'll do with a B.A. in Finance, either. I just picked it because I heard it's better than Marketing and it's easy to get a job. I have a friend who is going into Nursing, and she wants to graduate in 2 years. Nurse majors make $5000 a month so I am wondering if I can get that kind of salary, too. :p

    What about you guys? What are you studying, or what did you study? And what is your career? :)
     
  2. Terro

    Terro Well-Known Member

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    14,327
    Stuff I learned from my years of school:

    -Get into a major that has jobs. Passions are nice, but in the long run when you get out of school, what next?
    -Make sure you don't limit yourself. Japanese-only may be a stretch. Most jobs I'm finding, much prefer your to know computer and tech stuff. Lots of people I know actually took what are called 'programming bootcamp' just to have it look good on the resume, as jobs will see what you HAVE done, and not really what you CAN do.
    -Nurses make a lot, but there's too many people currently going into nursing, versus how many positions are currently available (aka, you need to wait for the older generations to retire before there is a surplus of jobs).
    -Finance is a good thing, but you gotta be good at it. Many jobs have financial positions, but the thing is that you NEED to once again prove that you have worked on projects etc before.

    I say all this as a graduate of this year, struggling to find work because no one wants a fresh-out-of-uni applicant, who hasn't done any projects or side job things to show that you can do stuff :/ Make sure you do stuff like that, or get into those clubs or whatever. (Business major here - all jobs I look for, currently just want managers :/ )
     
  3. Luma

    Luma Well-Known Member

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    14,565
    @Terro ^I think studying what you like is fine, like you said people care more about what you've done than studied anyways. No major is going to automatically get you a job in a company, and if you hate what you studied you're gonna have trouble going the extra mile to chase that job. People have different strategies/thought process about this though, that just my take. Also probably depends on tuition costs~

    I think Finance has more Math than Accounting, but don't worry about performance in Calculus carrying over; it's very different in my experience. That said, I found Accounting to be more difficult than Finance, a lot of memorization involved~ (I only did 2 years of those though. Managerial accounting sucked out my soul)

    For translating; look for example at this Square Enix job posting. The requirements are not super high, but note that they'd prefer people with experience in translating whatever, books, videos, etc, hell even just writing stuff in general.

    I majored in Marketing, and bombed out of Comp Sci, but in hindsight I think taking another kick at the CS can would have been a good idea. Not for job possibilities but that I gave up too easily, and lacked motivation in university times~
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2016
  4. Terro

    Terro Well-Known Member

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    14,327
    @Luma: How did your job hunt go after graduating?
     
  5. Luma

    Luma Well-Known Member

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    14,565
    Nothing related to my major that's for sure :p

    (taught English in Japan for 3 years, now in between work)
     
  6. Ryos

    Ryos Active Member

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    2,103
    Japanese/finance is good if you plan on going into some kind of job that capitalizes on trade with Japan (and Japan's back on the rise in many sectors, so there's definitely demand for that sort of thing in California and other international company locations). If you're specifically looking for a job with a game company, the combo's really not going to lead you to many scenarios but certainly either of those could have openings at any given time (and as Luma mentioned, the bar's generally pretty low for what sorts of experience are being looked at for translation simply because it's a lot of work. Jessica Chavez's descent into madness with the first TitS game is equal parts horrifying and fascinating). Financial positions are frequent but as stated, you're often expected to be an expert out of the gate.

    I'm definitely going to go against Terro's advice when it comes to nursing. If it's something you want to do (it's a LOT of work that's getting more and more tedious in the area of paperwork and the nonsensical world of insurance, so keep that in mind), there's a TON of demand for that line of work anywhere, though you may have to be open to moving to areas that aren't as saturated (if you want to move to a smaller city, there's going to be a ton of demand for medical professionals).

    I was an East Asian history major (focusing in Japanese history) and I will say I, like Luma, don't do anything remotely similar to that for work. In hindsight, I wish I'd stuck it out with my initial plans to go into computer science (or anything STEM) as there's huge demand and compensation is at a premium, especially if you can land a coveted position with one of the Silicon Valley giants. I don't think the degree would be incredibly useful to what I'm doing (the courses tend to be extremely outdated due to how quickly technology changes) but there are a lot of employers who tend to be dismissive of a less than optimal degree when working in that line of work.
     
  7. papa box

    papa box Member

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    363
    everything is dying as society reaches the future, all is useless. dehumanize yourself and face to bloodshed

    (torn between biology and social work, fucking around at community college forever while dying of age, never listen to me, no advice on your situation, i love my friends, etc)
     
  8. Terro

    Terro Well-Known Member

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    14,327
    @Ryos: ok yeah you are right about the nursing in big city thing. I know people right now doing it and were actually advised to pick a different medical career, due to a surplus of workers, and no demand in the Bay Area. Moving somewhere else is an option IF you are up for relocating, though.
     
  9. DustyStarr

    DustyStarr Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    I just graqduated from Community College and will be going to CSUSB soon, and I am majoring in communications with concentrations focusing on media studies and public relations/marketing. Put two years into Japanese and plan to continue with it at CSUSB, though I might take art classes instead because I really enjoyed my Computer Art class, and my most favoritist career would be working on the design aspects of games, but I like community orientated stuff which is kinda why I veered towards communications.

    Like everyone else here I was going to start with computer science, but it took SO long to get the math classes I needed that I decided to stick with COM because I did not want to be at RCC for like 6 years... kinda wish I stuck with it but I would still be taking classes.

    Never really thought about accounting really, but maybe I should have done it because I like math, am good at it, and they make bank. Man if only I had thought of that.

    If nothing else at least CSUSB is good about getting you practical experience; they have a lot of clubs and every concentration requires a practical experience class or two. They pride themselves on the fact that many recruiters will hire CSUSB students because they train you while they teach you.
     
  10. Terro

    Terro Well-Known Member

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    14,327
    ^ I was trained while I was in school. Y no pick me to hire?? Oh right, that Barkeley etc competition I gotta deal with -_-
     
  11. DustyStarr

    DustyStarr Well-Known Member

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    11,766
    Location:
    California
    Study more as in spend more time studying for the classes you have, or take more classes in general?
     
  12. DustyStarr

    DustyStarr Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    Huh really? I would hope it's not about the prestige... that sucks though: you have some experience ;~;
     
  13. Terro

    Terro Well-Known Member

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    I did work on one official project in school, but it's not the type that they want into the job applications >_> Plus you need to know all this B2B software, that you really can't learn unless you've used it AT a job before :/ All the software I did use was meaningless :/
     
  14. DustyStarr

    DustyStarr Well-Known Member

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    11,766
    Location:
    California
    Damn that would have been fine for me: I can make the time, it was just the number of classes and time it took to get that that made majors like CS hard for me to stomach.
     
  15. papa box

    papa box Member

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    363
    One thing I was told to do that has been helpful when I did it is the field or specific job you are interested in, look for people who have it via LinkedIn or other websites where you can see their resumes or qualifications and such and get an idea of what you would need. Yes a lot of job finding comes down to who you know, internships, and just straight luck but I found it helpful in the confidence department.
     
  16. Ryos

    Ryos Active Member

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    2,103
    That's pretty common, unfortunately. It's very much a chicken and the egg paradox. You can't get the experience doing something until you get the (OJT) experience doing something. I think I mentioned it here before in another thread but there was a job listing about half a decade ago that asked for 5 years of experience in a particular version of SharePoint. This would not have been unusual if it weren't for the fact that particular version had not come out less than a year before the job was advertised. So even the developers would not have qualified. >_>
     
  17. flarecde

    flarecde Member

    Messages:
    281
    Location:
    New York
    This is very common in IT. Non-IT management over an IT department rarely knows anything about IT, so they just put random stuff on the requirements. I've learned to ignore the reqs if you think you can fake it and just apply anyways. For IT, Uni is useless (although required), 99% of your job will be learning stuff via Google.

    As far as nursing goes, around here nurses are seriously scarce. I don't think the agency I work for ever has all their nurse positions filled. I know a couple other nurses and none of them had issues getting jobs.

    Computer science on the other hand... I'd recommend it about as much as acting at this point. Unless it is absolutely both a passion and a talent, don't bother. Most of the low level work is outsourced, and the big companies only want the cream of the crop. Until I landed my current job, I was seriously considering getting out of CS/IT and going to get training to become an electrician.
     
  18. Terro

    Terro Well-Known Member

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    14,327
    I guess pretty much now we have our official (complaining) looking for work/college stuff topic :p

    Found a PAID intern I can maybe do... I'll need to look into the company more. I think that's important, because I learned my lesson once when I desperately needed a job, didn't see the red flags for the requirements, and almost got into a pyramid scheme :p They sure do hide it, but when I got several calls back that day about it, I thought it was weird.... and THEN looked up the company >_> At this point though, I pretty much need a paid internship. Whatever I take, I'm quitting my job to do so. I'm landing myself in a depression being so old and STILL in frekain retail. Sucks that I graduated so late. I did it, but it's like I wanna buy a house and settle, so I NEED NEED NEED something good, and quick >_> Life in my 20's has by far not been easy, given different circumstances that came up over time. I need this... Sad how society has come to the point where many people still live at home into their early 30s due to no jobs/housing and rent expenses. YOU DID THIS TO US, OLDER GENERATIONS!!!
     
  19. flarecde

    flarecde Member

    Messages:
    281
    Location:
    New York
    Quite sad indeed :(. My parents had a house in the same neighborhood I am living in now by my age. But I'm barely affording an apartment. When they moved I contemplated buying their house, but the taxes alone are more than I pay in rent!
     
  20. Terro

    Terro Well-Known Member

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    14,327
    My parents lived in a the age where there was SURPLUS of jobs and not enough workers!! Imagine that: a time where companies had to try to COMPETE to grab workers by offering a variety of incentives, just to try and reel in employees to their business and not the other guys'!! My parents didn't even go to college or anything, and hello jobs right out of high school that pay really well!! -_- Now it's like "oh you want to apply? What can YOU do for US? And what HAVE you done, already?"


    EDIT: In my neighborhood, rent pretty much = mortgage payments, so it's really a better investment to buy. Oh, and if you want one of the bajillion townhomes they have been making in the Bay Area to fit all them new tech workers? Same price as a house with a private lil yard and stuff! So no point in those, either.
     

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